Joyce's Color Film Favorite December 2014

A year has gone by so quickly! This makes me a little melancholy and a little nostalgic.  I am a little sad that my kids are growing up way too fast.  However, I am so thankful that I was able to document my whole year beautifully on film.  At the end of each year, I gather up all the favorite images and print them in an Artifact Uprising album.  My kids love to flip through our family "Year Book".  When family and friends come over for visits, my kids will welcome our guests with a stack of Year Books.  They would giggle and laugh at each picture with fond (and not so fond) memories. I am a firm believer that the personal work is more important than my client work. Personal work is where I grow and learn as a photographer.  This year, I am starting a new project: 365 Project {FILM}.  This project will encompass a several smaller technical and artistic projects.  Since I am known to be a quitter of 365 project....or any project in the past, I have enlisted two of my favorite filmies to work along to keep me on track. What is your plan this year?  Do you have a special project in mind?  I would love to hear it!!

In the meantime, here are my favorites from December!  Don't forget to submit your film images on Little Bellows Facebook Page with #LBfilm.  Stay safe and Happy New Year! 559661_10152406162371493_2889282959171204702_n Molly Matcham Photography   1271187_843895789273_894313172661594261_o Amy Bethune Photography   1614572_764298826941394_5013255286944896238_o Natalie Seeboth Photography   10688474_10204195754666447_5453432708375811628_o Jaclyn Shepard Photography   10696259_10205191188278925_298599208131276455_n Nicole Lattanzi Photography   10700403_10205391917421179_3915133486880399116_o Catherine Rodriguez

 

Blog Contributor and Writer:  Joyce Kang

Joyce Kang selfie black and white on mamiya c330Joyce Kang is a children & family photographer in Austin Texas.  She is also a mentor and an instructor for Embrace The Grain, an intro to film photography workshop.  She is married to her best friend and enjoys outdoors with her family.  She loves to curl up with a good book and has a terrible addiction to any thing that tops with a heaping scoop of ice cream drizzled with chocolate fudge!

Follow Joyce and see more of her work at: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google+

Joyce's Black and White Film Favorites Nov 2014

Black and white film is the root of all things photography. It's simple, beautiful and classic. I love the nostalgic feeling of a grainy black and white film image. I have tried to duplicate the look on my digital camera but never succeeded. There is something about a black and white film image...it's real, it's raw, and it's alive!  Congratulations to all the photographers featured here.  Your images make my heart sing!  Keep posting your beautiful film images on Little Bellow Facebook Page and hashtag #LBfilm for a chance to be featured!  

Here are the Black and White Film Favorites Nov 2014:

Lately, I have found myself drawn to squares.  Maybe I am being biased because I just got my dream camera, Rolleiflex, and it's as beautiful as the name. I am head over heels over this square image and the flawless composition.  I love how Amy uses the ceiling light and the dark wood floor as the leading lines to direct my eyes into the frame.  She then uses the repetition of the geometric shapes creates a steady rhythm and balance in and around the frame: the cabinets, the appliances, the slight switches, the dish towel, and even the kitchen island.

What are they doing?

Is this a mother and her child?

Is she baking cookies or preparing something delicious while her little boy is looking on?

I want to explore this image and know more about what is keeping the little boy's attention here.

I feel like an intruder looking in at a private moment.

Despite the vast negative space within this square frame, I feel the warmth of the relationship, I hear the exchanges of tender conversations, and I smell cookies that are freshly baked.

I sense the abundance of unconditional love.

Amy Bethune

Amy Bethune Photography

 

Carrie Geddie

Carrie Geddie Photography

 

Erica Sandusky

Erica Sandusky Photography

 

Jennifer Capozzola Photography

Jennifer Capozzola Photography

 

Kate Tuttle Photography

Katy Tuttle Photography

 

Kim Hildebrand Photography

Kim Hildebrand Photography

 

Kim Tsui Photography

Kim Tsui Photography

 

Phyllis Meredith Photography

Phyllis Meredith Photography

 

Megan Boyer Photography

Meghan Boyer Photography

 

Miriam Dubinsky Photography

Miriam Dubinsky Photography

 

I encourage you all to participate in submitting your film images. "Joyce's Film Favorites" is an on-going bi-monthly feature. The only requirement for the submission is that it is...film. That's it! So, don't forget to share your beautiful film images on Little Bellows Facebook Page when your receive your scans!

 

Blog Contributor and Writer:  Joyce Kang

©Joyce C. Kang-DDKang001017-R1-E006-Edit-2001Joyce Kang is a children & family photographer in Austin TX.  She is also a mentor and a film workshop instructor for Embrace The Grain.  She is married to her best friend and enjoys outdoors with her family.    She loves to curl up with a good book and has a terrible addiction to any thing that tops with a heaping scoop of ice cream drizzled with chocolate fudge!

Follow Joyce and see more of her work at: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google+

Cat Thrasher | November 2014 Film Photographer Spotlight

10728935_10152750315383798_1767247622_nI  have been following Cat Thrasher's work for a while now.  One thing that made the most impression on me is her approach to simple and classic portraits.  Her work is absolutely breath-taking!  It has an elegant aesthetic and style that I have not seen anywhere else.  Her use of natural light in her studio is out of this world.  Today, I have the honor to interview her for my Film Photographer Spotlight feature on Little Bellows.  Let's get started!

 

Joyce: how did you get started in photography?

 

Cat: My first professional job was in 2005, when a friend of a friend asked me to take pin-up photos of her to send to her boyfriend, who was stationed in Iraq. "He's got all these photos of women in his tent…I want him to have photos of me." I was 23 and in college at UVa at the time. But it became a thing that I specialized in early on. My clients called them "sexy photos" because the term "boudoir photography" hadn't caught on yet.
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Joyce: browsing through your website, I noticed that you only photograph clients on black and white film, why?  Anything thing specific you can share with us why you choose black and white over color?

 

Cat: By only using one camera and sticking to black and white, I have put limits on what I do. I made the decision to do this gradually, but it started after processing umpteen million digital photos for a few weddings that had backed up on me back in 2010. I was so disillusioned by what I was doing: everything was so virtual, intangible, and so plentiful, that I began to wonder what each photo meant, to me, to the bride and groom, to anyone, if they began in such an abstract way, on the computer. How real were they, if I could not touch them? How real were they, if the bride and groom just wanted the high res DVD and never printed any? I knew they were feeling anxiety too, with 1000+ photos per wedding, they were having trouble choosing what to print, so they were putting it off for years and years. On this particular post-wedding occasion, I had to take a break from shooting for about a month. I bought some oil paints. I painted a picture of my husband. Oil painting is a long process, and forces patience. You paint a layer, then you wait a week for it to dry. Then you paint another layer, and wait a week, and so on. It takes months to paint one painting. It took me about 3 weeks to paint this portrait of Jim.

 

After this incident, I continued shooting digital for a few years, but I knew something needed to change. I began teaching myself film photography, and trying out new cameras. One day in 2012, I rented a Hasselblad from the local camera store. I photographed my friend Joanna, using just black and white. Something changed that day. The feeling of the Hasselblad, the double-flop-flop of it's shutter, the fact that it took no batteries…it was like a romance that started at that moment. Joanna's reaction to the photos was so positive, and I loved them too. It was a match, between that camera and me.

 

So, your actual question here was why I shoot in black and white, but it's not just about the black and white…it's about the limitations of black and white, using square format, the Hasselblad itself, and the studio setting. Digital taught me that there is a point of diminishing returns when it comes to quantity and unlimited choices. My current set-up is so limited because, sometimes, it is within limitations that we can truly thrive.
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Joyce:  I love the personal connection of the subjects in your photographs, and the subjects are very natural and relaxed.  Do you direct your clients or you simply sit back and wait for the moment?  How do you get past that "awkward" moment when you first start a session with a new client?

 

Cat:  I choose to let the awkward moments occur, and to be okay with it.  But there are ways to minimize it.  First, I believe that every photographer should have their go-to poses ready and waiting, before their client even walks in the door. Sandra Coan calls this "consistent, predictable routine."  In my case, I have about 3 poses that I'm ready to put my subject in. I put them in those positions, photograph them, and when we're done they're like "well, I was nervous, but that was so easy!"

 

Second, I bring positive energy to the shoot. You can't take away your client's nervousness, so don't try. But what you CAN do is have a confident, positive approach to every session. That confidence and positivity is contagious, and many times, you might find that your clients relax without you even trying.
CatThrasherPortfolio-09CatThrasherPortfolio-02

 

Joyce:  Your use of indoor light is stunning!  What do you look for when you shoot indoors?  Do you favor shooting in studio/indoors more than outdoors, and why?

 

Cat:  You need lots of light to shoot indoors. I look for large windows, and prefer north-facing. Outdoor light is great too, it just behaves differently. Outdoor light permeates everything, it gets into every nook and cranny. Indoor south-facing windows can provide similar light to being outdoors, because it really fills a room thoroughly. But indoor north-facing windows provide an isolated glow that is very dramatic. Light is everything.

 

Joyce:  If you have one advice you can give to those who are just starting out on film photography, what would it be and why?

 

Cat:  I'd say, start with one camera, one lens and one film stock. Become a specialist. If you find something you love, stick to it.

 

Joyce:  If you can spend one day with one person (present or past), who will it be and what would you talk about?

 

Cat:  My grandmother Margaret. She died when I was 2. I'd ask her what it was like to live in the first half of the century, and what it was like being a mother to her 5 children.

 

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Joyce:  What is your favorite film stock and camera, and why?

 

Cat:  Current film obsession is Ilford Pan-F Plus 50. Slow, smooth, mysterious. Favorite camera is my Hasselblad 501CM and Zeiss 85mm lens.

 

Joyce: What is one photography accessory/gear (other than camera and lens) you can’t do without?

 

Cat:  Hand-held light meter! Don't really need anything else.
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Joyce:  Tell me more about Film for the Studio Photographer Workshop you have with Sandra!  It's such an exciting venture.  I heard there are new topics in store for the future attendees!

 

Cat:  Oh man! This workshop is so fun!! We focus on indoor natural light photography. We teach workshop goers how to make great portraits inside using window light, and how the metering is different for black and white versus color film. We go over what film is, the chemical processes, how we approach our own photo shoots, how to work with labs, and other fun things.

 

The business portion is new, and we're so excited about it. Photography is a tough business to be in, because there are so many photographers out there. For this portion of the workshop, we'll be going over healthy ways to approach your photography business, how to work with clients, and my personal favorite: how to connect with your ideal client.

 

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Something fun:

Who is(are) on your playlist right now?
Lake Street Dive!
Complete this sentence:  “I wish my kids would hurry up and go to sleep so I can watch…” 
The News Hour
A quote you live by:
"Be the change you wish to see in the world." -Ghandi
Where is the most exotic place you have ever been?
Petra, Jordan
The first item on your bucket list?
I just did it - build my own photo studio!
Your favorite hobby(ies) besides photography
Gardening, reading the New Yorker.
Beer or Wine
BOTH!
Flip flops, sneakers or sexy stilettos
Sneakers, but this changes regularly.
Airplane, train or automobile
Train!
Two truth and a lie, go!
Can't it all just be truth?

CatThrasherPortfolio-23 You can see more of Cat Thrasher's work at: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

 

Blog Contributor and Writer:  Joyce Kang

Joyce Kang selfie black and white on mamiya c330Joyce Kang is a children & family photographer in Austin Texas.  She is also a mentor and an instructor for Embrace The Grain, an intro to film photography workshop.  She is married to her best friend and enjoys outdoors with her family.  She loves to curl up with a good book and has a terrible addiction to any thing that tops with a heaping scoop of ice cream drizzled with chocolate fudge!

Follow Joyce and see more of her work at: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google+

Joyce's Top 10 Color Film Favorite | Oct 2014

Every month at Little Bellow Facebook Page, we receive tons of beautiful film images by some of the most talented film photographers.  Film photography is definitely gaining momentum and become increasingly popular among both hobbyist and professional photographers.  Since I started shooting with film, I feel my techniques improved tremendously. Not only I have less to cull because I shoot with more intention, I am developing more awareness of the elements and how they work in the scene of an image.  I encourage every photographer to learn how to shoot film, it makes you a better photographer, no doubt! If you are already shooting film and would like to have your work featured here, please submit your film images at Little Bellow Facebook Page  and tag it using #LBfilm.  I can't wait to see more from our fans!

Here are the top 10 color film favorite for October 2014: 1072417_10152403423648870_1477010527329931199_o

Megan Dill Photography

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 Molly Matcham Photography

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Sandra Coan Photography

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Heather Chang Photography

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Yasmina Cowan Photography

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Amy Bethune Photography

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Amanda O'Donoughue Photography

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The Red Mop - Léa Jones

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Nicole Lattanzi Photography

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Jaclyn Shepard Photography

Blog Contributor and Writer:  Joyce Kang

Joyce Kang selfie black and white on mamiya c330Joyce Kang is a fine art lifestyle children & family photographer in Austin Texas.  She is also a mentor and a film workshop instructor for Embrace The Grain.  She is married to her best friend and enjoys outdoors with her family.  She loves to curl up with a good book and has a terrible addiction to any thing that tops with a heaping scoop of ice cream drizzled with chocolate fudge!

Follow Joyce and see more of her work at: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google+

How to photograph kids everyday on film

Photograph your kids everyday on film is not as hard as you think.  With the proper gear set up and the right film in your camera, you are good to go.  Here are 5 quick tips I use to photograph my own kids on film: 1. Shoot close and wide

35mm to 28mm lenses are my go to when I am out and about with my children.  I find that the angle and length of a 35mm is most versatile:

  1. I can shoot in a tighter space and "be there" with my kids without having to back up too far.
  2. I can also shoot portraits without too much distortion.
  3. I can pull back and shoot wide for an environmental image

In fact, I love the wide angle lens so much that all of my medium format SLR cameras are now equipped with 35mm focal length equivalent lenses.

©Joyce C. Kang 2013-NRkang001120-R9-E177001

2. Keep it Simple

It doesn't matter if I am planning to shoot indoors or outdoors,  I always make sure to pack my bag with the intention to photograph children.  I don't know about you, but my kids are movers and shakers (in the literal sense of these words)!  Gone are the days when I load my bag down with a camera and 3 lenses for "just-in-case" situations.  Simplicity is mom's best friend, wouldn't you agree?  These are my essentials when I am heading out with my children:

  1. one camera and one lens
  2. handheld light meter
  3. film speed of 400 or faster, ie. Portra 400, TriX 400, or Ilford 3200 (although I do like to throw in Ektar and Slidefilm in the mix)

©Joyce C. Kang-NRkang2000818-R1-E009002©-NRkang000508-R4-E057001

3. Let there be {bright sun} light

 

Although I prefer to shoot in soft and pleasing lighting such as open shade and golden hour, I am no longer confined myself to shoot ONLY under these lighting.  With film's amazing highlight latitude, I can shoot during mid-day bright sun without worrying about blown highlights.  I am a happier mom because I no longer have to deal with cranky, hungry and exhausted kids in the late afternoon/evening hours.  Here are a few things I always keep in mind when I am out shooting under bright sunlight:

  1. be mindful of unpleasing shadows
  2. utilize The Zone System to expose film
  3. know the stop differences between highlights and shadows

©Joyce C. Kang-SBWkang000711-R1-E003001©Joyce C. Kang-HPBkang000922-R1-E010002

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4. Let them be kids

Let the kids be who they are...kids.  I let my kids run, jump, and go nuts as long as they keep themselves and others safe.  In my opinion, "looking into the camera and smile" portraits are over-rated.  I love capturing my children's childhood authentically on film.

©Joyce C. Kang 2013-3909003946-R1-E017002©Joyce C. Kang 2013-3909003946-R1-E010002

5. Relax and enjoy

Allow yourself to put down the camera and enjoy the moment with your family.  This is something I started to do when I go on a family outing: I would put away the camera after shooting just one roll of 35mm/220 film or 2 rolls of 120 film.  Believe me, it's HARD to do when I see so many "kodak" moments missed by not having my camera.  However, what is more important in my heart is spending real and quality time with my guys.  I don't want my kids to see a photographer, but a mother who is there and present for them!

©Joyce C. Kang 2013-CCkamg000527-R1-029-13001

Blog Contributor and Writer:  Joyce Kang

Joyce Kang selfie black and white on mamiya c330Joyce Kang is a fine art lifestyle children & family photographer in Austin Texas.  She is also a mentor and a film workshop instructor for Embrace The Grain.  She is married to her best friend and enjoys outdoors with her family.  She loves to curl up with a good book, binges on Netflix and has a terrible addiction to any thing that tops with a heaping scoop of ice cream drizzled with chocolate fudge!  Her next workshop starts March 1, 2015.  Mark your calendars now!

Follow Joyce and see more of her work at: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google+

Joyce's Film Favorites in Black and White October 2014

Shooting with black and white film did not come easy for me at the beginning. I am a color junkie! If you take a peek into my closet, you will find that I have clothes in every color imaginable. One of my favorite designer of my "younger" days was Betsey Johnson when she was still designing most of the collection herself...go figure that out! Obviously, seeing the world in tones of gray is one of the challenges when people switch from color to black and white film.  Simply seeing the light is no longer enough.  It will take lots of practice and self training to be able to recognize contrast, tone, and textures and how to make them all work together under the light you are shooting in.

When I saw these beautiful black and white film images submission on our Little Bellow Facebook, I knew I have to show them off here.:

 

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Verva Photography

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Klodjana Dervishi Photography

 

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Megan Dill Photography

 

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Lilly Lane Photography

 

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Amanda O'Donoughue Photography

 

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Heather Chang Photography

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Rebecca Lindon Photography

 

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Kim Tsui Photography

 

Blog Contributor and Writer:  Joyce Kang

Joyce Kang selfie black and white on mamiya c330Joyce Kang is a fine art lifestyle children & family photographer in Austin Texas.  She is also a mentor and a film workshop instructor for Embrace The Grain.  She is married to her best friend and enjoys outdoors with her family.  She loves to curl up with a good book and has a terrible addiction to any thing that tops with a heaping scoop of ice cream drizzled with chocolate fudge!

Follow Joyce and see more of her work at: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google+

Joyce's Color Film Favorites-September 2014

You all are not making this easy for me at all!  I am extremely thankful for all the  yummy goodness to choose for this week's color film favorites -September 2014 picks.  I am not against digital, I think it's lovely in its own special ways.  But Film, it has that beautiful quality that just can't be duplicated by digital.  I want more!  So let's get your submission right now. Remember the 3 easy steps for your film submissions:

  1. tag your submission using hashtag #LBfilm-so I can find them quickly
  2. size image at least 900 px wide for the optimal quality
  3. JPEG file

 

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Jacqueline Rose Photography

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Klodjana Dervishi Photography

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Amy Bethune Photography

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Molly Matcham Photography

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Jennifer Kapala Photography

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Lumos Photography

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Kim Tsui Photography

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Yasmina Cowan Photography

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The Paper Deer Photography

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Nicole Lattanzi Photography

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Justine Knight Photography

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Jaclyn Shepard Photography

Did you see my Black and White film favorites for September 2014?  If not, you must go check it out!

Blog Contributor and Writer:  Joyce Kang

©Joyce C. Kang 2013-3912003948-R1-036-16A001Joyce Kang is a fine art lifestyle children & family photographer in Austin Texas.  She is also a mentor and a film workshop instructor for Embrace The Grain.  She is married to her best friend and enjoys outdoors with her family.  She loves to curl up with a good book and has a terrible addiction to any thing that tops with a heaping scoop of ice cream drizzled with chocolate fudge!

Follow Joyce and see more of her work at: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google+